#CES2015

#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The Complete list of WYSKR Posts

In the run-up to International CES, WYSKR kept an eye on the content being shared on social media by and about the event's speakers. When this content received significant attention on social, we shared it with you.

Why?

Because great events curate great speakers, and great speakers know - and often share - great content when they see it.

Below is the complete list of links to WYSKR's #CES2015 posts along with the names of the event speaker who shared that content.

Each post features a description of the content as well as related video. Thanks for reading and let us know what you think!

January 9, 2015
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: New Clues for the Internet of Today
Chris Riley (@MChrisRiley) of Mozilla 

January 8, 2015
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Connected Devices Raise F.T.C. Privacy Concerns
Joseph Lorenzo Hall (@JoeBeOne) of the Center for Democracy & Technology 

January 7, 2015
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Creating a Data Culture
Greg Clayman (@Clayman) of Vimeo

January 6, 2015
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The Future of CES Belongs to Marketers
David Berkowitz (@dberkowitz) of MRY

January 5, 2015
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: How the 'On-Demand Economy' Is Reshaping Companies and Careers
Greg Portell (@gportell) of A.T. Kearney

January 4, 2015
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Anxiety in an ICYMI "In Case You Missed It" World
Shawn Dubravac (@shawndubravac) of the Consumer Electronics Association 
Wes Nichols (@wesnichols) of MarketShare

January 3, 2015
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The New Science of Building Great Teams
Anthony Skinner (@askinner404) of Moz

January 2, 2015
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: 14 Predictions for Wearables in 2015
Heidi Forbes Öste (@ForbesOste)

December 31, 2014
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Few Minorities in Non-Tech Jobs in Silicon Valley
David Berkowitz (@dberkowitz) of MRY

December 30, 2014
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Goodbye to One of the Best Years in History
Adam Thierer (@AdamThierer) of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University

December 29, 2014
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Gallup Economic Confidence Index Turns Positive
Josh Gottheimer (@jgotthei) of Microsoft

December 28, 2014
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Why Make Immigration Easier for Great Programmers 
Seth Rogin (@thesethrogin) of Mashable

December 27, 2014
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The Top 5 Digital Entertainment Fails of 2014 
Todd Spangler (@xpangler) of Variety

December 26, 2014
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The Most Inspiring Women of 2014 
Stephanie Horbaczewski (@stylehaulsteph) of StyleHaul

December 23, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Programmatic Ad-buying Coming to TV
Michael Kassan (@MKassan) of MediaLink

December 22, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Strategic Partnerships in a Digital World 
Wes Nichols (@wesnichols) of MarketShare

December 21, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Outrage and Empathy on Social Media
Andrew Wallenstein (@awallenstein) of Variety
Adam Orth (@adam_orth) of Three One Zero 
Joanna Stern (@JoannaStern) of The Wall Street Journal 

December 20, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Making Multichannel Networks Profitable
Dan Sweeney (@d_sweeney) of the Allant Group

December 19, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The Top Internet of Things Acquisitions in 2014
Nate Williams (@naywilliams) of Greenwave Systems

December 18, 2014
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The Next Wave of Tech Disruptions
Amar Hanspal (@amarhanspal) of Autodesk 

December 17, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: How to Regulate the Sharing Economy
Adam Thierer (@AdamThierer) of the Mercatus Center 

December 16, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Google Ventures Year in Review
Tracy Isacke (@TracyIsacke) of Silicon Valley Bank 

December 15, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: New Questions in Mobile
Christopher Glode (@cglode) of MapMyFitness 

December 14, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: How Teams Innovate
Marc Landsberg (@marclandsberg) of Social Deviant

December 13, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Social Robotics in the Home
Cynthia Breazeal (@cynthiabreazeal) of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

December 12, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The Current State of Machine Intelligence
Hala Hemayssi (@HalaHemayssi) of the Experience Design Bureau 

December 11, 2014 
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: 10 Amazing Tech Innovations in 2014
Hala Hemayssi (@HalaHemayssi) of the Experience Design Bureau

December 10, 2014
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The Smartphone Driver's License
Shawn Dubravac (@shawndubravac) of the Consumer Electronics Association 
Nuala O'Connor (@privacymama) of the Center for Democracy & Technology 

December 9, 2014
#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Using Apple Pay in iOS apps
Kevin Harwood (@kevinharwood) of Mutual Mobile

 

#CES2015 Speakers on Social: New Clues for the Internet of Today

Curious about how the authors of the book "The Cluetrain Manifesto" view the Internet of today?

International CES speaker Chris Riley (@MChrisRiley) of Mozilla joined Joe TrippiDave MorinNilofer MerchantJohn BattelleBrad FeldAnna MaseraCraig NewmarkEthan Zuckerman and many hundreds of others in tweeting about a new listicle titled "New Clues" by Doc Searls and David Weinberger, two of the authors of the book The Cluetrain Manifesto first published in 2000:

The object of much attention and commentary at the time, The Cluetrain Manifesto presented a set of 95 theses describing how the Internet was changing the world at the dawn of the new millennium. 

Coming 15 years later, "New Clues" is intended to be a follow-up to that work. It describes the current state of the Internet in the form of 121 theses presented under the following headings and subheadings:

Once were we young in the Garden...
a. The Internet is us, connected.
b. The Internet is nothing and has no purpose.
c. The Net is not content.
d. The Net is not a medium.
e The Web is a Wide World.

But oh how we have strayed, sisters and brothers...
a. How did we let conversation get weaponized, anyway?
b. "We agree about everything. I find you fascinating!"
c. Marketing still makes it harder to talk.
d. The Gitmo of the Net.
e Gravity's great until it sucks us all into a black hole.
f. Privacy in an age of spies.
g. Privacy in an age of weasels.

To build and to plant  
a. Kumbiyah sounds surprisingly good in an echo chamber.
b. A pocket full of homilies.
c. Being together: the cause of and solution to every problem.

In addition to serving as a way to share their latest thinking, Searls and Weinberger "intend these clues to be an example of open source publishing so that people can build their own sets of clues, format them the way they like, and build applications that provide new ways of accessing them." 

And while we're on the subject...

For more insights from Doc Searls on the future of the Internet, watch his recent talk "Reality Check: Things You Wish You Knew Five Years from Now" presented by the MIT Enterprise Forum of the Central Coast (the talk is 40 minutes followed by Q&A):


WYSKR at International CES

January 6-9, 2015

January 6-9, 2015

In the run-up to International CES, WYSKR kept an eye on the content being shared on social media by the event's speakers.  When that content received significant attention on social, WYSKR shared it with you.

Why?

Because great events curate great speakers, and great speakers know - and often share - great content when they see it.

A list of links to all of WYSKR's International CES content is now available via this post. Thanks for reading and let us know what you think!

#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Connected Devices Raise F.T.C. Privacy Concerns

Curious about the Federal Trade Commission's concerns about privacy and the Internet of Things?

International CES speaker Joseph Lorenzo Hall (@JoeBeOne) of the Center for Democracy & Technology joined the MIT Technology ReviewShelly PalmerRoxane Divol and dozens of others in tweeting about a New York Times post titled "CES: F.T.C. Chairwoman Notes Concerns Raised by Connected Devices":  

The post reports on the speech delivered by F.T.C. Chairwoman Edith Ramirez at International CES 2015 which...

"...offered a prescription for protecting consumer data collected by Internet-connected gadgets like wearable fitness trackers and 'smart home' devices, previewing themes of a coming report by the agency on Internet privacy and security."

Chairwoman Ramirez expressed concern that with so many new devices collecting an ever-increasing amount of user data, effective policies are needed to help protect consumer privacy.

Among the policies mentioned by the Chairwoman in her speech were:

  • Privacy by design, i.e. accounting for privacy controls at the beginning of the product or service design process
  • Data minimization, i.e. gathering the least amount of personal information necessary to perform a given function
  • Greater transparency in the way companies use customer data

The NYT post indicated that an F.T.C. report on the Internet of Things is expected in the next few weeks.

And while we're on the subject...

For more on privacy by design, transparency and other related IoT issues, watch this recent TedInstitute talk titled "Privacy by design: humanizing analytics" by Marie Wallace, an analytics strategist at IBM:


WYSKR at International CES

January 6-9, 2015

January 6-9, 2015

In the run-up to International CES, WYSKR kept an eye on the content being shared on social media by the event's speakers.  When that content received significant attention on social, WYSKR shared it with you.

Why?

Because great events curate great speakers, and great speakers know - and often share - great content when they see it.

A list of links to all of WYSKR's International CES content is now available via this post. Thanks for reading and let us know what you think!

#CES2015 Speakers on Social: Creating a Data Culture

Curious about what it takes to become a data-driven organization? 

International CES speaker Greg Clayman (@Clayman) of Vimeo joined Michael ArringtonJohn Lilly, Bradford Cross, Dave Pell, Tricia Wang, Julia Kirby and hundreds of others in tweeting about Hilary Mason and DJ Patil's new e-book published by O'Reilly Media titled "Data-Driven: Creating a Data Culture":

Mason and Patil share real-world insights into what works and doesn't work for organizations who want to become more data-driven.  Aimed at a non-technical audience, the e-book is divided into five sections:

  1. What Is a Data Scientist?
  2. What is a Data-Driven Organization?
  3. What Does a Data-Driven Organization Do Well?
  4. Tools, Tool Decisions, and Democratizing Data Access
  5. Creating Culture Change

Much of the guidance is framed as a series of questions. For example, Mason and Patil say the following questions "can be asked about every data science problem":

  • What is the question we’re asking?
  • How do we know when we’ve won?
  • Assuming we solve this problem perfectly, what will we build first?
  • If everyone in the world uses this, what is the impact?
  • What’s the most evil thing that can be done with this?

Available at no cost with e-mail registration, the e-book provides advice that is both practical and actionable.

And while we're on the subject...

For a discussion of the relationship between big data and the Internet of Things, watch this video from DLD NYC 2014 titled "IoT meets Internet of People" featuring David Kenny of The Weather Company, Stefan Denig of Siemens AG and Hilary Mason of Fast Forward Labs.


WYSKR at International CES

January 6-9, 2015

January 6-9, 2015

In the run-up to International CES, WYSKR kept an eye on the content being shared on social media by the event's speakers.  When that content received significant attention on social, WYSKR shared it with you.

Why?

Because great events curate great speakers, and great speakers know - and often share - great content when they see it.

A list of links to all of WYSKR's International CES content is now available via this post. Thanks for reading and let us know what you think!

#CES2015 Speakers on Social: The Future of CES Belongs to Marketers

Curious about why the future of International CES belongs to marketers?

International CES speaker David Berkowitz (@dberkowitz) of MRY explains why in a new post published on adage.com titled "The Future of CES Belongs to Marketers" that was tweeted by Bitly, Michelle Killebrew, The Center for Digital Strategies at Dartmouth's Tuck School of Business and dozens of others:

Berkowitz argues that CES isn't as much about showcasing new technology as it is about companies sharing their thinking on how consumers will want to spend their time. Given that, marketers should have a greater role at CES because...

"Marketers understand time. In the age of radio and TV, it's what they bought, and marketers are all the more obsessed with understanding how people spend time across various media... Whatever marketers are buying, the electronics are often the gateway to the consumer, and there's one show that celebrates that."

And while we're on the subject...

For a good overview of how a leading consumer electronics brand approaches marketing, check out this video from Videonomics Santa Barbara Summit 2014 titled "Smart TVs and Smarter Marketing" featuring Lily Knowles, VP of Product Marketing at Vizio:


WYSKR at International CES

January 6-9, 2015

January 6-9, 2015

In the run-up to International CES, WYSKR kept an eye on the content being shared on social media by the event's speakers.  When that content received significant attention on social, WYSKR shared it with you.

Why?

Because great events curate great speakers, and great speakers know - and often share - great content when they see it.

A list of links to all of WYSKR's International CES content is now available via this post. Thanks for reading and let us know what you think!